Developer Blogs

Since these are blogs, there are no guarantees as to the accuracy or readability of the information contained therein. The entries are also a mix of German and English (Don't worry...one language per entry!)

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v4.0: New modeling API, expanded UI support and data improvements

Published by Marco on in Quino

The summary below describes major new features, items of note and breaking changes. The full list of issues is in the release notes below and is available to those with access to the Encodo issue tracker.

Highlights

Metadata & Modeling

Most of the existing metadata-building API has been deprecrated and replaced with a fluent API that is consistent and highly extensible.

C# Handbook 7.0

Published by Marco on in .NET/C#

 I announced almost exactly one year ago that I was rewriting the Encodo C# Handbook. The original was published almost exactly nine years ago. There were a few more releases as well as a few unpublished chapters.

I finally finished a version that I think I can once again recommend to my employees at Encodo. The major changes are:

  • The entire book is now a Git Repository (GitHub). All content is now in Markdown. Pull requests are welcome.
  • I’ve rewritten pretty much everything. I removed a lot of redundancies, standardized formulations and used a much more economical writing style than in previous versions.
  • Recommendations now include all versions of C# up to 7
  • There is a clearer distinction between general and C#-specific recommendations
  • There are now four main sections: Naming, Formatting, Usage and Best Practices, which is broken into Design, Safe Programming, Error-handling, Documentation and a handful of other, smaller topics.

Here’s the introduction:

“The focus of this document is on... [More]”

Adventures in .NET Standard 2.0-preview1

Published by Marco on in .NET/C#

.NET Standard 2.0 is finally publicly available as a preview release. I couldn’t help myself and took a crack at converting parts of Quino to .NET Standard just to see where we stand. To keep me honest, I did all of my investigations on my MacBook Pro in MacOS.

IDEs and Tools

I installed Visual Studio for Mac, the latest JetBrains Rider EAP and .NET Standard 2.0-preview1. I already had Visual Studio Code with the C#/OmniSharp extensions installed. Everything installed easily and quickly and I was up-and-running in no time.

Armed with 3 IDEs and a powerful command line, I waded into the task.

Porting Quino to .NET Standard

Quino is an almost decade-old .NET Framework solution that has seen continuous development and improvement. It’s quite modern and well-modularized, but we still ran into considerable trouble when experimenting with .NET Core 1.1 almost a year ago. At the time, we dropped our attempts to work with .NET Core, but were encouraged when Microsoft shifted gears from... [More]

A tuple-inference bug in the Swift 3.0.1 compiler

Published by Marco on in Development

I encountered some curious behavior while writing a service-locator interface (_protocol_) in Swift. I’ve reproduced the issue in a stripped-down playground[1] and am almost certain I’ve found a bug in the Swift 3.0.1 compiler included in XCode 8.2.1.

A Simple, Generic Function

We’ll start off with a very basic example, shown below.

 Simple argument with label

The example above shows a very simple function, generic in its single parameter with a required argument label a:. As expected, the compiler determines the generic type T to be Int.

I’m not a big fan of argument labels for such simple functions, so I like to use the _ to free the caller from writing the label, as shown below.

 Simple argument without label

As you can see, the result of calling the function is unchanged.

Or Maybe Not So Simple?

Let’s try calling the function with some other combinations of parameters and see what happens.

 Label-less argument with tuples and multiple parameters

If you’re coming from another programming language, it might be quite surprising that the Swift compiler happily compiles every single one... [More]

Two more presentations: Web tools & Quino upgrade

Published by Marco on in Development

Check out two new talks on our web site:

Networking Event: How Encodo builds web applications
At our last networking event, Urs presented our latest tech stack. We’ve been working productively with this stack for most of this year and feel we’ve finally stabilized on something we can use for a while. Urs discusses the technologies and libraries (TypeScript, Less, React, MobX) as well as tools (Visual Studio Code, WebStorm).
Quino: from 1.13 to 4.x
Since Quino 1.13 came out in December of 2014, we’ve come a long way. This presentation shows just how far we’ve come and provides customers with information about the many, many improvements as well as a migration path.

Quino Documentation: Table of Contents

Published by Marco on in Quino

Thoughts on .NET Standard 2.0

Published by Marco on in Development

Check out two new talks on our web site:

Microsoft recently published a long blog article Introducing .NET Standard. The author Immo Landwerth appeared on a weekly videocast called The week in .NET to discuss and elaborate. I distilled all of this information into a presentation for Encodo’s programmers and published it to our web site, TechTalk: .NET Standard 2.0. I hope it helps!

Also, Sebastian has taken a Tech Talk that he did for a networking event earlier this year, Code Review Best Practices, on the road to Germany, as Die Wahrheit über Code Reviews So klappt’s!

v3.1: New metadata builder API

Published by Marco on in Quino

The summary below describes major new features, items of note and breaking changes. The full list of issues is also available for those with access to the Encodo issue tracker.

Highlights

This release is a “bridge” release that has the entire new Metadata API as well as the older version, which is marked as obsolete. It is intended that projects upgrade to this version only temporarily in order to more easily migrate to the 4.0 Metadata API. At that point, projects should immediately upgrade to Quino 4.0, from which all obsolete methods have been removed. Once 4.0 is available, there will be no more bug-fix releases for this release.

Metadata construction

  • Remove MetaId/Guid parameters from all metadata-building APIs
  • Remove all dependencies and requirement for the MetaBuilder; make MetaBuilder obsolete.
  • Drastically reduce the surface of the MetadataBuilder and base classes and improve dependency-resolution
  • Replaced AddClassWithDefaultPrimaryKey(“A”) with AddClass(“A”).AddId()... [More]

Why you shouldn’t use Bootstrap when you have a styleguide

Published by urs on in Web: HTML/CSS/JS

From a customer, we got the request to apply a visual style guide (VSG) to a Bootstrap-based application. Since we do have a lot of experience with applying style guides on web applications and styling in general, we accepted the job and started to evaluate the details.

Which version of Bootstrap to use

The most recent stable version of Bootstrap is 3.3.6. However, when you go to the Bootstrap website, there is an announcement that Bootstrap 4 “is coming”. The current state of Bootstrap 4 is alpha and the last blog post is from December 2015 which is almost half a year ago. It also is not clear, when version 4 finally will be available and stable and so we had to use the old Bootstrap 3 for this project.

But even here, there is some obscurity going on: Bootstrap was initially developed with LESS but for some reason they decided to switch to SASS. Even if we prefer to use LESS at Encodo, we decided to use SASS for this project to be able to upgrade to Bootstrap 4 more easily when... [More]

Tabs vs. Spaces … and how many?

Published by Marco on in Development

Encodo has long been a two-space indent shop. Section 4.1 of the Encodo C# Handbook writes that “[a]n indent is two spaces; it is never a tab.”, even though “[t]he official C# standard […] is four spaces.” and that, should you have a problem with that, you should “deal with it.”

Although we use our own standards by default, we use a customer’s standards if they’ve defined their own. A large part of our coding is now done with four spaces. Some of us have gotten so accustomed to this that four spaces started looking better than two. That, combined with recent publicity for the topic[1], led me to ask the developers at Encodo what they thought.

  • Urs was open to the idea of using tabs because then “everyone can use whatever he likes and we can avoid the unnecessary discussion about the ideal value (why does it have to be an even value? I want 3 spaces!!!) Further, we might be able to save some disk space ;)”
  • Sebastian was emphatically not open to the idea of tabs because “Tabs is just a lie.... [More]”